Surprise me – digital heritage lab

Surprise me!

This is a free online resource collection for heritage professionals that brings the collective intelligence of the sector together in one place, by you, for you.

Resources

Woman and man sitting in front of computer monitor
Photo by NESA by Makers on Unsplash.
webinar

Digital skills for fundraising

Hands on a braille reader for a computer
Photo by Sigmund on Unsplash.
webinar

Accessible websites and delivery — getting started

Working with digitised collections — shaping stories
Image courtesy of Big Pit National Coal Museum © National Museum Wales
webinar

Working with digitised collections — shaping stories

A young boy in a blue top and yellow hat uses a blue magnifying glass to look closer at a tea scale.
A young boy uses a magnifying glass to look closer at a tea scale. © Photo Steve Carse.
case-study

How the events of the past year gave a museum the opportunity to improve their digital foundations

Person sitting in a theatre auditorium with laptop open
© AMA Digital Marketing Day 2019. Photo Lewis Roden.
webinar

Digital Audience Development

Opened laptop with digital stats on the screen.
Photo by Path Digital on Unsplash.
webinar

Analytics — how to present your digital stats effectively

Benny's giant head with bobble hat peers from behind a Birmingham landmark at a crowd of people.
Benny's Babbies, 2020 Artist: Cold War Steve (Christopher Spencer). Photo by Birmingham Museums Trust, licensed under CC0
guide-toolkit

Artificial Intelligence: Digital Heritage Leadership Briefing

Looking down at a mobile phone and mug of coffee with a spoon in it
Photo by Nathan Dumlao on Unsplash.
webinar

How to create video content for your social media channels

Group of people taking part in an activity.
AMA conference 2019 © Marion Botella
webinar

Digital Access and Inclusion — Getting started

The reconstituted cutaway view of the first Rose, by William Dudley, incorporating material by Jon Greenfield and C. Walter Hodges, taken from the guidebook, ‘The Rose, Bankside’s first theatre 1587’.
The reconstituted cutaway view of the first Rose, by William Dudley, incorporating material by Jon Greenfield and C. Walter Hodges, taken from the guidebook, ‘The Rose, Bankside’s first theatre 1587’. Image courtesy of The Rose Theatre Trust.
case-study

How online events had a positive impact on audience engagement and donations for a small heritage organisation

video camera with microphone attached with red background
Photo by Kushagra Kevat on Unsplash.
webinar

Webinar: Producing multimedia content on a budget

Website usability and writing for the web
Photo by Kat Stokes on Unsplash.
webinar

Website usability and writing for the web

How to expand the functionality of your WordPress website
Photo by Striving Blogger on Unsplash.
webinar

How to expand the functionality of your WordPress website

Computer screen with website stats and graphs.
Photo by Stephen Phillips - Hostreviews.co.uk on Unsplash.
webinar

Analytics — using data to plan content and engage audiences

A man opens a large case in a darkened store room
© Wessex Archaeology
guide-toolkit

A guide to running digital heritage wellbeing projects

Smart mobile phone with Facebook next to a laptop
Photo by Timothy Hales Bennett on Unsplash.
webinar

How to develop a digital engagement strategy that works for your organisation

Front facade of Liverpool Everyman Theatre made up of rotating screens of with full-length pictures of different people
Liverpool Everyman Theatre facade © AMA
webinar

Reaching digitally excluded audiences

A smartphone displaying app icons for Instagram, Facebook and Twitter
Image by dole777 on Unsplash.
webinar

Webinar: Social media essentials

Image of a man building inside an boat hull
Image courtesy of Skylark IX Recovery Trust ©
case-study

How digital has helped the delivery of a community project ― Skylark IX’s digital story

Hereford Cathedral welcoming visitors to Heritage Open Days 2020.
Hereford Cathedral welcoming visitors to Heritage Open Days 2020. ©Hereford Cathedral.
case-study

Digital audience engagement during a heritage project … and a pandemic

The Digital Heritage Lab is a project managed by the Arts Marketing Association (AMA) in partnership with Arts Fundraising & Philanthropy, One Further and the Collections Trust and funded by The National Lottery Heritage Fund as part of the Digital Skills for Heritage initiative. It is a free programme for small and medium sized heritage organisations seeking to develop their digital capabilities and capacity.