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CultureHive > Guide/Toolkit > How can your museum better welcome families and young people who are blind and partially sighted?
8th April 2019 Carol Jones

How can your museum better welcome families and young people who are blind and partially sighted?

By: Kids in Museums


This guide by Kids in Museums offers simple ideas to help overcome the hurdles faced by those with visual impairment in visiting museums and cultural heritage sites.

Kids in Museums believes museums are for everyone. But many families and young people who are blind or partially sighted find visiting museums difficult.

Blindness is a complex range of visual impairments and everyone’s experiences and requirements are different. An individual who was born blind may have different needs to someone who has lost their sight. According to Vision UK, around half of children who have a visual impairment have additional needs, such as a hearing impairment, physical disability or learning difficulties.

Making a museum accessible to visitors who are blind or partially sighted isn’t just about providing Braille labels or one-off events.

Deeper cultural change and understanding of the range of visual impairments is needed to build staff confidence, break down barriers and create equal experiences for these visitors.

Here are some simple ideas to help overcome hurdles faced by families and young people who are blind or partially sighted.

Download the guide

| Published:2019

Smart tags: blind audiences partially sighted audiences young people museums inclusion families

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