Digital stories: collaboration and volunteering

Black typewriter on a white background

Theme 5: Digital stories

Digital Volunteering and Connected Heritage are two programmes that took place in 2022-2023 as part of the National Lottery Heritage Fund’s Digital Skills for Heritage initiative.

There were 17 Digital Volunteering projects that created and established new digital volunteering opportunities and roles for digital activities that could be done either remotely or in-person. Their stories and learnings are shared below.

Connected Heritage was set up to explore how digital tools can help solve some of the challenges organisations experience when collaborating with each other. Some of these digital collaboration stories and learnings are shared below.

How to guides – digital volunteering

Each of the 17 projects that took part in Digital Volunteering have produced how to guides on recruiting, training, managing and supporting remote or in-person digital volunteers. These guides cover a wide range of digital activities and projects.

Multi-coloured hands on a black background
Creating online promotional material
Behind the scenes filming at Ripon Cathedral. Image courtesy of Ripon Cathedral ©

Creating online promotional material

Outside shot of Torre Abbey and surrounding gardens and grounds.
Torre Abbey, Torquay, Devon. Image courtesy of Torbay Council©

Digitising museum collections

Old passports, ration books and identity cards
Roberta Hewitt: Lost and Found in the Archives. Image courtesy of CollabArchive©

Producing digitally creative and publicly engaging content that responds to archives

Pottery shard from a Farewell mug at Portland Museum
3D model: pottery shard from a Farewell mug from Earl of Abergavenny shipwreck. Image courtesy Portland Museum©

Creating 3D digital models of museum collection objects

Screenshot of heatmap of new archaeological sites in Devon
Heatmap of new archaeological sites in Devon. Image courtesy of University of Exeter©

Image analysis for heritage mapping, using open-access software and remote sensing data

How to guides – digital collaboration

These ‘how to use digital tools to support collaboration’ guides were created by projects that took part in the Connected Heritage programme (2022-23) and address some of the challenges organisations, networks and communities experience when collaborating with each other. These guides cover a range of digital collaboration tools.  

Three young people sitting on a bench in a gallery looking at a wall of photographic portraits.

Digital stories – volunteering

Six of the 17 projects that took part in Digital Volunteering have produced vlogs sharing more details and learnings from their digital volunteering project. 

A spiral image made up of photographic portraits.
A young woman with long blonde hair using Polycam app on an iPad and an iPad pro to create a 3D model.
Screenshot from video showing a volunteer creating a 3D model of a collection piece.

Video: Earl of Abergaveny project, Portland Museum

Two women sitting alongside microphones recording a podcast
Screenshot from video showing podcast recording at Glasgow Women's Library

Video: Digital Volunteering project, Glasgow Women’s Library

Screenshot of an airborne light data image capture
Airborne light data image identifying archaeological site. Image courtesy of University of Exeter©

Video: Unlocking Landscapes project, University of Exeter

Old passports, ration books and identity cards
Roberta Hewitt: Lost and Found in the Archives. Image courtesy of CollabArchive©

Video: CollabArchive — empowering and bringing to life archives

Digital stories – collaboration

Four of the projects that took part in Connected Heritage programme have produced vlogs sharing more details and learnings from their digital collaboration journeys.

Screenshot made up of photographic portraits

Digital stories – Digitally Democratising Archives

Digitally Democratising Archives was an action research project designed and led by The Audience Agency, supporting 10 organisations to explore archives, community engagement and digital tools. It was funded as part of the Connected Heritage programme.

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Digital Heritage Hub is managed by Arts Marketing Association (AMA) in partnership with The Heritage Digital Consortium and The University of Leeds. It has received Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) and National Lottery funding, distributed by The Heritage Fund as part of their Digital Skills for Heritage initiative. Digital Heritage Hub is free and answers small to medium sized heritage organisations most pressing and frequently asked digital questions.

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