100 digital questions answered

Across four themes we answer small to medium-sized heritage organisation's most pressing and frequently asked digital questions


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Dr Ruth Daly

Dr Ruth Daly is a Teaching Fellow in Creative Industries at the University of Leeds.

Ruth teaches on the MA in Culture, Creativity and Entrepreneurship at Leeds. She has previously taught on modules across the Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Culture including Cultural Analysis, English Literature, Visual Culture and Art History.

She completed her PhD in Critical Theory and Cultural Studies in2020. Her research was concerned with the relations between experimental writing, feminist interventions in psychoanalytic theory, postcolonial studies and ethical reading practices. She is also editor of cultural studies journal parallax a quarterly peer-reviewed academic journal publishing work in cultural studies, critical theory and philosophy.

Head shot image of Dr Ruth Daly

Resources by Dr Ruth Daly


A woman on a path taking a picture of the trees that surround it

Open-source software and creative commons-licensed materials offer important opportunities for the smaller organisation to enhance their digital capabilities. But are there drawbacks with such free resources? This guide provides definitions and examples along with a review of what to consider when using open-source and creative commons software and materials.

A living statue performs on a busy street

So you have established some key areas to help you improve your environmental performance: what next? This guide outlines how digital technologies can help you modify and adapt your business operations to be kinder to the environment.

Six kayakers on a river approach a bridge

The adoption of new technologies may support your initiatives to ‘go green’ and reduce your environmental impact. Which are the key areas to focus on that will enable your organisation to become more environmentally sustainable? This guide explores where the biggest impacts may be felt for your organisation and what methods you might use to measure your existing environmental footprint.

A young woman strolls through the nave of a cathedral

Your digital strategy should provide an overarching vision to guide the use of digital in the different areas of business within your organisation. Underneath this, you will need additional strategies relating to digital content and digital marketing. This guide explains their relationship and provides examples from other organisations on how these strategies have attracted wider and more diverse audiences.

A young couple read an exhibit at the Charles Dickens Birthplace Museum, a small, terraced house in Old Commercial Road in Portsmouth, Hampshire

This resource highlights how heritage organisations can engage with ‘hard-to-reach’ audiences and widen the participation of underrepresented groups. It explains how to improve digital participation, develop socially inclusive practices and embrace the heritage insights of source communities. By doing so, you can start to establish the trust needed to involve groups that may have previously been excluded from the heritage sector.

Digital Heritage Hub is managed by Arts Marketing Association (AMA) in partnership with The Heritage Digital Consortium and The University of Leeds. It has received Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) and National Lottery funding, distributed by The Heritage Fund as part of their Digital Skills for Heritage initiative. Digital Heritage Hub is free and answers small to medium sized heritage organisations most pressing and frequently asked digital questions.

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